Libido & sexual problems - Alternative Remedies
Association of Women for the Advancement of Research and Education Today is
 
ProjectAWARE logo


    You are here:  Home >  Managing Menopause >  Alternatives >  Remedies >  Libido Bookmark and Share

 

  Menopause Experience
  Menopause
Perimenopause
The 35 Symptoms
Premature Menopause
Postmenopause
Personal Stories
  Managing Menopause
  The Options
HRT
Alternatives to HRT
Exercise
Lifestyle
  Health Issues
  Breast Cancer
Heart Health
Osteoporosis
  Resources
  Article Archives
Books & Newsletters
Finding a Doctor
Glossary of Terms
Health Links
News Stories
Pharmacies
Studies & Trials
  Docs Corner
  Hormone Health
Wellness & You
Q & A
  about
  Who We Are
Kudos
  Advertising Statement
Privacy & Confidentiality
Link to Us
Support AWARE
Contact Us
  bottom
   

 

 

 

Remedies for Menopausal Symptoms

The Menopause Self Help Book by Susan M. Lark, M.D.,
The Wild Rose Scientific Herbal by Terry Willard, Ph.D.,
Menopausal Years The Wise Woman Way by Susun S. Weed
are drawn heavily upon for this segment. All references are provided here.

LIBIDO and SEXUAL PROBLEMS

With onset of menopause, ovulation slows and ceases, and you may feel decreased libido. If you’re not feeling as youthful, don’t like the image in the mirror, or you feel alone, menopause can be a scary thing. It need not be scary.

As new vision and sense of self is gained during these menopausal years, you may now feel sexy because it’s what you want, not what someone else wants. Susun Weed tells us "Take heart. Crowned Crones [Native American cultural term] tell us that old women are very, very sexy, but only when they want to be, not when someone else wants them to be."

Herbs

There are several glycoside-rich herbs that help libido in particular and are good sources of phytosterols which balance and nourish nerves, the endocrine system (including adrenals) and the kidneys. These include liferoot (Senecio aureus), groundsel (Senecio vulgaris), and Jacob’s groundsel (Senecio jacobaea). These plants grow where they can collect a wide variety of trace elements and micronutrients that slowly accumulate in the body as they are used. Susun Weed suggests that once the nervous and endocrine systems and adrenals are in top shape, the libido may be restored.

CAUTION: Senecio can cause temporary distressing changes in menstrual and premenstrual patterns during the first few months of use. Because of the potentially toxic alkaloids concentrated in the roots, only the flowering tops and leaves of liferoot should be used.31

Ginseng (Panax) is also said to improve libido, reduce hot flashes, and aid a variety of other menopausal symptoms.31

Certain plants such as Spanish fly or nutmeg, held in high esteem by many cultures for their aphrodisiac properties, have been found to be genitourinary irritants, rather than sexual stimulants, according to Dr. Susan Lark. Traditional Indian medicine considers a number of plants such as saffron crocus and priya-darsa to have extraordinary aphrodisiac powers. Yohimbe, a plant aphrodisiac, is the base of several drugs currently prescribed to treat impotence.

Progesterone

In his practice, Dr. John Lee found that "the women losing interest in sex had water retention, fibrocystic breasts, depression, dry and wrinkling skin, and irregular, sometimes heavy periods." He "gradually came to understand that these signs and symptoms were indicative of a progesterone deficiency caused by a failure to ovulate while estrogen continued to be produced, which is to say loss of sex drive correlates with progesterone deficiency, not estrogen deficiency." When these women used the progesterone supplementation he recommended, the story changed, and they reported that their sex drive had returned.

Dr. Lee’s clinical experience was at odds with what he had learned in medical school where he had been taught that only estrogen and testosterone were vital to normal sex drive. In 1994 a study found that physiologic doses of progesterone restored sex drive, whereas abnormally large doses had been found to inhibit sexual behavior.

 

Previous Symptom Symptom Index Next Symptom

Researched and written by the ProjectAWARE group, 2000

 

 

 

 

 
 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Copyright 1997-2010 ProjectAWARE. All rights reserved.

Questions or comments about this site? Contact the Website Editor, <aware.editor@project-aware.org>

Updated 09/29/2010